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Bosphorous Turkish Cuisine

Bosphorous Turkish Cuisine Review

Far from the hustle and bustle of the more "tourist-y" areas of Orlando, Winter Park is a not-so-hidden gem that is not to be missed. Restaurants, artisans, and shops populate this community with the epicenter being Park Avenue. Along the pedestrian-friendly main street and adjacent side streets, new experiences are waiting at every turn- from doggie boutiques to restaurants serving every type and style of cuisine. There's always something new to try with over 140 shops, restaurants and museums.
In the mood to venture out and try something completely new for my recent birthday, I explored the expansive roster of restaurants who call Winter Park home. In delving in, each one sounded better than the next, but on first glance, it became more and more challenging to determine what was and was not gluten and dairy free.
Bosphorous Turkish Cuisine jumped out at me right from the start. In checking out their website, I was hooked by the beautiful dishes pictured and their emphasis on serving "fresh, home-made food" with an emphasis on hospitality. Although the website did not mention gluten or dairy free options, a quick email to the restaurant's contact email, the owner quickly responded with a complete list of all of the allergens in each dish. I was duly impressed and now convinced that Bosphorous was the way to go for my celebration with friends.
Lavas Bread- definitely not gluten free

I made the reservation for an early dinner, which proved to be a great decision because the evening was one of Florida's perfect days- not too hot, cool, rainy or buggy, with not a cloud in the sky. Like many of Park Ave's restaurants, Bosphorous is open to the sidewalk which provides a fun view of the happenings going on outside while also providing a oasis within the decor and atmosphere of the restaurant.
We started off the evening with an appetizer that is most definitely not gluten-free: Lavas. A hollow, balloon-like bread, at first glance, it's eye-poppingly large and comes with an array of assorted sauces, dips and other toppings. Our server, who also was gluten-free, offered to bring me some fresh vegetables on the side to try the dips, but I opted out knowing that the entree portions were rather large. My friends decided to take a risk and try some Turkish sour cherry fruit juice, and we laughed as each tried the sour, tart drink. I stuck with my go-to San Pellegrino.
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FAQ

Oku
What are some of the dishes authentic only to Turkish cuisine?

Dishes that no neighbor of Turkey claims as theirs?

I have never heard of anybody making Perde Pilaf, except the Turks.

Sidon
Who has a better cuisine Israel or Lebanon?

Thats Lebanese cuisine..
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4qYYYjOr00k

Why not put videos on BOTH cuisines?


Can't choose, both are delicious. Considering half of Israelis are from near Middle Eastern background (Lebanese, Egyptians, Iranians, Iraquis, Morrocans, Yemenis...) it comes as no shock its cuisine is very influenced by this. And then you have the traditional Ashkenazi contribution and the Ethiopian contribution, it's fantastic.

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