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Ottoman people

Photography in Ottoman Istanbul

Postcards are an enormously popular way to share the memories of your journey with other people, and nearly all of us have received a postcard at one time or another. Like many people, I have a postcard collection, full of images from places I’ve gone or where my friends have travelled. My postcards are a physical reminder of memories I treasure.

The Hagia Sophia

Pascal Sebah, Turkish (1857 – 1886) Mosquee de Ste. Sophie, ca. 1860s. Albumen print. Purchased with Hillyer-Tryon-Mather Fund, with funds given in memory of Nancy Newhall (Nancy Parker, class of 1930) and in honor of Beaumont Newhall, and with funds given in honor of Ruth Wedgwood Kennedy. Photography by Petegorsky/Gipe. SC 1982:38-968

At the beginning of the 19th century, improved travel by train and by steamship offered Europeans greater access to Turkey and to Istanbul, then the capital of the Ottoman Empire. A traveler no longer needed to be wealthy to go in comfort throughout the near East. Now, a middle-class German could sign on for a planned tour that embarked from Italy, stopped at the pyramids of Cairo, traveled to the holy sites of Israel, and finally landed in Istanbul. With this influx of European travelers came a greater demand for art souvenirs, particularly photographs that could capture the sights and cultures of these far-off locales.

The Blue Mosque

Jean Pascal (Turkish, 1872 – 1947) of Sebah & Joaillier. Mosquee du Sultan – Ahmed, c. 1860s. Albumen print. Purchased with Hillyer-Tryon-Mather Fund, with funds given in memory of Nancy Newhall (Nancy Parker, class of 1930) and in honor of Beaumont Newhall, and with funds given in honor of Ruth Wedgwood Kennedy Photography by Petegorsky/Gipe. SC 1982:38-970

One photographer who took advantage of this growing market was Pascal Sebah. Under the Muslim Ottoman Empire, Istanbul was a thriving city with a multiethnic population, and Pascal’s family reflects this diversity: his father was a Syrian Catholic and his mother was Armenian.

Sebah opened his first studio in 1857 at the age of thirty-four. His reputation quickly grew, earning accolades from the Société Française de Photographie in Paris. During the height of his career, he collaborated with innovative Turkish painter Osman Hamdi Bey, and exhibited works at the 1873 Ottoman exhibition in Vienna.

Interior of the Blue Mosque

Jean Pascal (Turkish, 1872 – 1947) of Sebah & Joaillier. Interieur de la Mosquee Ahmed, c. 1860s. Albumen print. Purchased with Hillyer-Tryon-Mather Fund, with funds given in memory of Nancy Newhall (Nancy Parker, class of 1930) and in honor of Beaumont Newhall, and with funds given in honor of Ruth Wedgwood Kennedy Photography by Petegorsky/Gipe. SC 1982:38-971

Spurred on by his increasing reknown, Sebah opened a second studio abroad in Cairo. His photographs now included the sights and streets of Egypt. Pascal Sebah continued to travel between these two cities, and to show his work at international exhibitions, until he passed away in 1886 from the debilitating aftermath of a brain hemorrhage.

Bloomsbury Academic The Ottoman Peoples and the End of Empire (Historical Endings)
Book (Bloomsbury Academic)

Barbary pirates are from the Ottoman empire

by corflunk

Ottoman empire was in Turkey. The pirates hijacked ships and operated in the northern african provinces.
Barbary Pirates were not African.
Barbary Pirates were from the middle east.
I think you brought up the subject of the Barbary pirates because you wanted to show everybody that white people were slaves just as black people were.
The Barbary pirates and descendants of slaves in the United States have nothing in common.

Occupy Turkey THE PEOPLE WIN!

by AmericanAtheist

BREAKING NEWS : A Turkish court has cancelled the Taksim Square building project backed by Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan which sparked a nationwide uprising in Turkey. POWER TO THE PEOPLE!!
"A Turkish court has cancelled an Istanbul building project backed by Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan which provided the trigger for nationwide anti-government demonstrations last month, a copy of the court decision showed.
Authorities may well appeal against cancellation of plans for replica Ottoman-era barracks on Istanbul’s Taksim Square. But the ruling marked a victory for a coalition of political forces and a blow for Mr

No, until 1918 they were part of Ottoman Empire

by sweet_clarity

After World War I -- with the collapse of the Ottoman Empire -- the League of Nations assigned administration to The British Mandate.
After WWII, with sectarian violence increasing and both the Arabas and the Jews doing whatever they could to get rid of the Brits...
Britain dumped the problem into the hands of the UN, which voted for partition.
The Jews were happy to accept that decision, the arabs were not and the war of 1948 Ensued
DURING THE OTTOMAN ERA
The people in the west bank, and the eastern portion of present-day Israel

On the fifth day, God invented a People

by phantom_gecko

In denying the existence of the Palestinian people, Zionism sought to create the political climate for their removal, not only from their land but from history. When acknowledged at all, the Palestinians were re-invented as a semi-savage, nomadic remnant. Historical records were falsified – a procedure begun during the last quarter of the 19th century but continuing to this day in such pseudo-historical writings as Joan Peters’ From Time Immemorial.
The Zionist movement would seek alternative imperial sponsors for this bloody enterprise; among them the Ottoman Empire, Imperial Germany, the British Raj, French colonialism and Czarist Russia

Forgotten Ottoman legacy: Armenian intellectuals  — Today's Zaman
Her novel “Geğdz Hancarner” (Phony Geniuses), in which she sarcastically criticizes Armenian intellectuals, was never completed because of pressure from male intellectuals. She was a socialist and an anti-militarist.

Stork Craft Stork Craft Tuscany Glider and Ottoman, Espresso/Beige
Baby Product (Stork Craft)
  • Featuring metal, enclosed ball bearings for a smooth glide motion to help you unwind
  • Generous seating room with padded arms and arm cushions, with a pocket to store your belongings
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  • This is the ultimate glider and ottoman combination for any room in your house
  • Some assembly required
The Longest Day/Ottoman And The Sea
TV Series Episode Video on Demand ()
TV Non-Branded Items Adams 8380-30-3731 Resin Adirondack Ottoman, Honeysuckle
Lawn & Patio (TV Non-Branded Items)
  • Honeysuckle Color
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JVC JVC World Sounds Catalogue
Music (JVC)

FAQ

James
What are turkish trousers like to wear and what is their history?

There is no such a thing Turkish trousers.... but we've got trousers which village people wear and it's called shalvar. it's really baggy at the bottom and people wear them in the villages when they work on the field... But now it's like a fashion.. even classy women started to wear them. they produce it reall fancy now as well... they are comfortable but i wouldnt wear them coz it looks so baggy and sometimes like you shite yourself and have diapers :))

Kevin7
Can someone tell me about traditional Turkish clothing?

Turkish clothing is an important part of their rich culture. Like the Turkish culture which has become rich being influenced by several empires and their own set of practices, Turkish clothing has also a very rich and variegated tradition of its own. Apart from the natural difference between men and women clothing, there are several other differences in Turkish clothing which depends on several occasions.

Turkish clothing is also reflection of various socio-cultural aspects of Turkish life and history in general. In historical time the Turkish race made a very wide and vast kingdom…

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